58 Matches Found, 1 thru 58 on this page.
Maker - Item# - Scale Description
CORGI - AA27005 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Westland Puma HC.1 Helicopter 72 Squadron, Aldergrove 1997

This model features:
- Rotorspan approximately 8" - Rotating propellers
- Optional undercarriage down
- Detailed crew figure
- Sliding door
[Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27107 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Messerschmitt BF109G-6 - Kurt Gabler JG300 "Red 8" [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA27202 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Avro Vulcan B2, XL321, 617 Squadron, RAF Scampton, Lincolnshire, 1964 [Age: 10 and up ]
CORGI - AA27304 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Hawker Fury K2065 1 Squadron - 100 Years of RAF [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA27604 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Hawker Hurricane MKI, V7795, Plt Off William 'Cherry' Vale, RAF 80 Sqn, Maleme, Crete, 1941

As strong German forces moved to secure their southern flank and rectify a failed Italian attempt to invade Greece, Allied forces found themselves in a steady retreat towards Crete. Extensive air operations saw large numbers of RAF aircraft engaged in fighting with both German and Italian air force units and despite initial successes, the came under increasing pressure.

Perhaps the most successful Hawker Hurricane Mk.I fighter of this difficult period was V7795, usually flown by Pilot Officer William Vale, of No.80 Squadron, Royal Air Force. Still displaying its standard RAF day fighter camouflage scheme, this unusual aircraft also included some additional field applied camouflage modifications to the leading edge and engine cowling, which were applied to just a small number of Hurricanes. Vale claimed eight enemy aircraft destroyed whilst flying this aircraft, during April and May 1941.

Following the success of the Hawker Hurricane during the Battle of Britain, it soon became clear that the Spitfire had the greatest potential for future development, which released the Hurricane for other duties. The rugged design of the Hurricane and numbers available to the RAF saw many machines sent overseas and as the war began to spread across the globe, so did the influence of the dependable Hurricane. From North Africa to Russia, the Hurricane continued to provide sterling service and continued to destroy Axis aircraft and military vehicles. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27605 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Hawker Hurricane MKI, P3576 J. B. Nicholson VC, 249 Squadron, August 1940

Following the success of the Hawker Hurricane during the Battle of Britain, it soon became clear that the Spitfire had the greatest potential for future development, which released the Hurricane for other duties. The rugged design of the Hurricane and numbers available to the RAF saw many machines sent overseas and as the war began to spread across the globe, so did the influence of the dependable Hurricane. From North Africa to Russia, the Hurricane continued to provide sterling service and continued to destroy Axis aircraft and military vehicles. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27606 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Hawker Hurricane MKI, YB-J, ‘Winged Popeye’ P.O. Leonard Walter Stevens No.17 Sqn, Debden, 1940

Following the success of the Hawker Hurricane during the Battle of Britain, it soon became clear that the Spitfire had the greatest potential for future development, which released the Hurricane for other duties. The rugged design of the Hurricane and numbers available to the RAF saw many machines sent overseas and as the war began to spread across the globe, so did the influence of the dependable Hurricane. From North Africa to Russia, the Hurricane continued to provide sterling service and continued to destroy Axis aircraft and military vehicles. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27607 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Hawker Hurricane MK. I - v6799 McKenz - 100 Years of RAF [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA27702 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge North American Mustang F51-D, 'Was that too fast?', 18th Fighter Bomber Group USAF, South Korea 1951

At the start of the Korean War, significant numbers of Mustang fighters were available to the USAF, although most were now serving with Air National Guard units. Now designated F-51D, the Mustang was no longer the premier fighter aircraft it was in WWII, due to the advent of jet technology, but it was still a highly capable long-range strike aircraft. As a close air support aircraft, the Korean War Mustang dropped more napalm and fired more rockets than any other aircraft involved in the conflict, as it served with four air forces in support of United Nations. It was also involved in some of the first spiralling dogfights with the new Soviet MiG-15 jet fighter. Highly susceptible to the latest anti-aircraft defences, many close air support Mustangs were lost during the Korean conflict.

The North American P-51 Mustang was arguably the finest fighter aircraft of WWII and was significant in finally subduing any hope the Luftwaffe had of offering resistance to Allied air incursions. Only seeing service in the final months of the war, the impressive Mustang possessed range, speed, firepower and manoeuvrability, which were attributes used to the maximum by USAAF and RAF fighter pilots, in their efforts to secure air superiority. The Mustang saw extensive service in the European Theatre and towards the end of the Pacific War, where it was to prove decisive in combat. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27703 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge North American Mustang Mk.IV, Werner Christie, No.150 Wing, RAF Hunsdon, 1945

As its history was very much connected to British requirements, it is no surprise that the Mustang was used extensively by the Royal Air Force during WWII, from the early Allison powered Mustang I, to the Dallas produced, Packard Merlin powered IVa. The final victory for a WWII RAF Mustang belonged to Norwegian ace Werner Christie, who was flying his personal machine KH790. Following the conclusion of a successful bomber escort mission over Germany, Christie led his Mustangs in search of Luftwaffe fighters. Flying above Finow airfield, he noticed a flight of Fw 190s and immediately dived to attack. His first burst of fire caught the wing of an unsuspecting Focke Wulf, blowing half of the wing off and sending the fighter spiralling into the ground. This would be Christie’s eleventh and final victory of the war.

Regarded as one of the most successful aircraft of all time and something of an American classic, the Mustang actually came into production following a British requirement for additional fighters. Rather than licence build the Curtiss P-40 fighters the British were looking for, North American Aviation promised a totally new aircraft, which would be superior to the P-40. A proud boast from this relatively new manufacturer, but could they pull it off? In record time, they built a prototype aircraft which showed great promise and the British immediately placed a large order. Originally powered by the American Allison V-1710 engine, the Mustang I was faster than the Spitfire an [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27704 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge North American Mustang P-51D, Captain Ray Wetmore 'Daddy's Girl', 370 FS, March 1945

As its history was very much connected to British requirements, it is no surprise that the Mustang was used extensively by the Royal Air Force during WWII, from the early Allison powered Mustang I, to the Dallas produced, Packard Merlin powered IVa. The final victory for a WWII RAF Mustang belonged to Norwegian ace Werner Christie, who was flying his personal machine KH790. Following the conclusion of a successful bomber escort mission over Germany, Christie led his Mustangs in search of Luftwaffe fighters. Flying above Finow airfield, he noticed a flight of Fw 190s and immediately dived to attack. His first burst of fire caught the wing of an unsuspecting Focke Wulf, blowing half of the wing off and sending the fighter spiralling into the ground. This would be Christie’s eleventh and final victory of the war.

Regarded as one of the most successful aircraft of all time and something of an American classic, the Mustang actually came into production following a British requirement for additional fighters. Rather than licence build the Curtiss P-40 fighters the British were looking for, North American Aviation promised a totally new aircraft, which would be superior to the P-40. A proud boast from this relatively new manufacturer, but could they pull it off? In record time, they built a prototype aircraft which showed great promise and the British immediately placed a large order. Originally powered by the American Allison V-1710 engine, the Mustang I was faster than the Spitfire and possessed greater range, but at higher altitudes, the performance significantly dropped off. In an attempt to rectify this deficiency, the Mustang was married with the successful and combat proven Rolls-Royce Merlin engine and the rest is history – the Merlin powered Mustang was a superb fighting aeroplane. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27705 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge North American Mustang P51-D "Hurry Home Honey", 44-1473 364th F/Squadron 357th Fighter Group

As its history was very much connected to British requirements, it is no surprise that the Mustang was used extensively by the Royal Air Force during WWII, from the early Allison powered Mustang I, to the Dallas produced, Packard Merlin powered IVa. The final victory for a WWII RAF Mustang belonged to Norwegian ace Werner Christie, who was flying his personal machine KH790. Following the conclusion of a successful bomber escort mission over Germany, Christie led his Mustangs in search of Luftwaffe fighters. Flying above Finow airfield, he noticed a flight of Fw 190s and immediately dived to attack. His first burst of fire caught the wing of an unsuspecting Focke Wulf, blowing half of the wing off and sending the fighter spiralling into the ground. This would be Christie’s eleventh and final victory of the war.

Regarded as one of the most successful aircraft of all time and something of an American classic, the Mustang actually came into production following a British requirement for additional fighters. Rather than licence build the Curtiss P-40 fighters the British were looking for, North American Aviation promised a totally new aircraft, which would be superior to the P-40. A proud boast from this relatively new manufacturer, but could they pull it off? In record time, they built a prototype aircraft which showed great promise and the British immediately placed a large order. Originally powered by the American Allison V-1710 engine, the Mustang I was faster than the Spitfire and possessed greater range, but at higher altitudes, the performance significantly dropped off. In an attempt to rectify this deficiency, the Mustang was married with the successful and combat proven Rolls-Royce Merlin engine and the rest is history – the Merlin powered Mustang was a superb fighting aeroplane. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA28003 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4, Fähnrich Hans-Joachim Marseille, ‘White 14’ 1940

The Messerschmitt Bf 109 series of fighter aircraft have to be regarded as some of the most famous aircraft ever to take to the skies. This diminutive and highly capable fighter was in constant production throughout the Second World War, as the basic Messerschmitt airframe proved to be highly adaptable and capable of significant modification. Making its combat debut during the Spanish Civil War, the Bf 109 was one of the first truly modern fighter aircraft, making its first flight before either the Supermarine Spitfire or the Hawker Hurricane - it could be argued that modern monoplane fighter design began with the Messerschmitt Bf 109.

During the Second World War, the Bf 109 earned a fearsome reputation with its adversaries and was synonymous with the ruthless effectiveness of the Wehrmacht, particularly during the early years of the conflict. It was also the mount of many of the worlds most accomplished air ‘aces’ and proved to be one of the most reliable and hard-hitting fighter aircraft ever produced. Significantly, the Messerschmitt Bf 109 was the most heavily produced fighter aircraft in history, with no fewer than 33,984 machines being built – undoubtedly one of the most important aircraft in the history of powered flight.

Already a Luftwaffe fighter ace by the start of the Battle of Britain, Josef ‘Pips’ Priller and the pilots of JG51 would be heavily involved in the fighting against the RAF over the summer of 1940, with many of his comrades falling to the guns of the British airmen. Priller and his Bf 109 were to score at least 14 victories during the Battle of Britain and was to eventually end the war with an astonishing 101 victories from 307 combat missions flown. Within this number, Priller claimed at least 68 Spitfires destroyed, which was the highest Luftwaffe ace tally against Britain’s most famous fighter. He was also one of only a small number of Luftwaffe aces to fight solely in the skies above Western Europe, against the best aircraft available to the Allies. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA28004 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4, 'Yellow 1' 9./JG 26, Caffiers, France, August 1940

The Messerschmitt Bf 109 series of fighter aircraft have to be regarded as some of the most famous aircraft ever to take to the skies. This diminutive and highly capable fighter was in constant production throughout the Second World War, as the basic Messerschmitt airframe proved to be highly adaptable and capable of significant modification. Making its combat debut during the Spanish Civil War, the Bf 109 was one of the first truly modern fighter aircraft, making its first flight before either the Supermarine Spitfire or the Hawker Hurricane - it could be argued that modern monoplane fighter design began with the Messerschmitt Bf 109.

During the Second World War, the Bf 109 earned a fearsome reputation with its adversaries and was synonymous with the ruthless effectiveness of the Wehrmacht, particularly during the early years of the conflict. It was also the mount of many of the worlds most accomplished air ‘aces’ and proved to be one of the most reliable and hard-hitting fighter aircraft ever produced. Significantly, the Messerschmitt Bf 109 was the most heavily produced fighter aircraft in history, with no fewer than 33,984 machines being built – undoubtedly one of the most important aircraft in the history of powered flight.

Already a Luftwaffe fighter ace by the start of the Battle of Britain, Josef ‘Pips’ Priller and the pilots of JG51 would be heavily involved in the fighting against the RAF over the summer of 1940, with many of his comrades falling to the guns of the British airmen. Priller and his Bf 109 were to score at least 14 victories during the Battle of Britain and was to eventually end the war with an astonishing 101 victories from 307 combat missions flown. Within this number, Priller claimed at least 68 Spitfires destroyed, which was the highest Luftwaffe ace tally against Britain’s most famous fighter. He was also one of only a small number of Luftwaffe aces to fight solely in the skies above Western Europe, against the best aircraft available to the Allies. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA28005 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4 - Wilhelm Bathasar - France, 1940

As the savage aerial fighting above the evacuation beaches of Dunkirk was taking a heavy toll on both sides, the airmen of Britain and Germany knew this was just a pre-curser of a more significant battle to come. Having lost valuable fighters during the Battle of France and Operation Dynamo, the RAF knew that they were facing a battle-hardened enemy, equipped with the most feared fighter aircraft in the world, the agile and heavily armed Messerschmitt Bf 109, which had ruthlessly cleared European skies of all opposition air forces sent against it.

Supremely confident and possessing much greater numbers, the fighter pilots of the Luftwaffe would be at a disadvantage for the first time, fighting against an organised RAF, equipped with excellent fighters of their own and having extremely well trained pilots. The Germans would also be fighting over enemy territory with the English Channel acting as a physical and psychological barrier during combat – if they were shot down, or suffered mechanical difficulties, their chances of getting back to France were now looking much less likely. Despite these new challenges, swarms of Messerschmitts crossed the Channel, determined to break the resolve of the Royal Air Force. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA28103 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Curtiss Tomahawk IIA AK402 P/O Neville Duke, 122 Squadron [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA32625 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Avro Lancaster AJ-M ED929 617 Squadron - 100 Years of RAF [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA32820 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge DH Mosquito B.IV DK296 - GB-G Flt. Lt. D A G ‘George’ Parry, RAF No.105 Squadron, Horsham St. Faith, June 1942

As one of the great aircraft of the Second World War, the De Havilland Mosquito can claim to be the world’s first truly effective multi-role aircraft, possessing great speed and being equally adept at performing missions as either a fighter or a bomber. When entering full production, the Mosquito was the fastest aircraft in the world and a closely guarded RAF secret – pilots operating the first Mosquito raids over occupied territory were instructed to burn their aircraft if crash landing safely, to avoid the Mosquito falling into German hands.

Constructed almost entirely of wooden laminate, the aircraft soon came to the attention of the British public, who referred to the Mosquito as the ‘Wooden Wonder’, a bomber that was able to out-run the Luftwaffe. From a German perspective, the Mosquito was arguably the British aircraft they coveted the most and despite attempts to produce their own equivalent, they could never match the impressive performance of the RAF Mosquito. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA33421 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Westland Sea King, HC.4 ZA290, 846 Naval Air Squadron, Falklands, 1982 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA33617 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Panavia Tornado GR4 ZA461 15XV R Squadron Centenary Scheme 2015 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA33618 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Panavia Tornado GR4 ZA459 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA34113 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Blackburn Buccaneer S2, XW538, 16 Squadron RAF Gutersloh November 1977 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA34214 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Chinook ZA683 27 Squadron - 100 Years of RAF [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA34317 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Focke Wulf FW190 A-8/R2 11 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA34811 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Vickers Wellington R1162 / AA-Y, ‘Y for Yorker’, RAF Feltwell, Norfolk, 1941 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA35415 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Sepercat Jaguar T4 XX838 - 100 Years of RAF

If it were at all possible to give the attractive SEPECAT Jaguar even better looks than it already possessed, the two seat training variant of the aircraft is regarded by many enthusiasts as being one of the most aesthetically pleasing post war jets to see service with the Royal Air Force. Although the tandem student/instructor configuration of training Jaguars appeared to make this variant significantly longer than the more numerous single seat big cats, the aircraft was actually only 2ft 3.5 inches greater in length, even though their appearance was that of a much more slender and elegant aeroplane. SEPECAT Jaguar T.4 XX838 was built in 1975 to T.2A (trainer) standard and subsequently became one of only eleven airframes to receive further upgrade to the final T.4 training variant of the aircraft, remaining with the RAF until the Jaguar was finally withdrawn from service in late 2006. For this RAF 100 series release, she is presented wearing the colours of RAF No.16 (Reserve) Squadron, which acted as the Operational Conversion Unit for future Jaguar pilots, following its reformation at RAF Lossiemouth in 1991. With its heritage as one of the oldest Royal Air Force Squadrons, the units badge features two crossed keys, one gold and one black, which can be traced back to the formation of the unit at Saint-Omer in 1915 and the Squadron’s proud army cooperation role. Providing vital aerial reconnaissance of enemy positions over the Western Front during the Great war, the two keys represent the Squadron’s effectiveness at unlocki [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA36013 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge BAE Hawk XX246 95-Y 100 Squadron - 100 Years of RAF

As 2018 marks the Centenary of the Royal Air Force, we can expect to see many RAF Squadrons commemorating the occasion by presenting one of their aircraft in attractive special markings. This is always popular with aircrew and enthusiasts alike and over the years has resulted in some memorable and extremely photogenic aircraft in the skies of Britain. As one of the oldest Squadrons in the RAF, No.100 Squadron are rightly proud of their heritage and to mark the occasion of their 95th Anniversary in 2012, they presented one of their BAe Hawk T.1 aircraft in a striking Bomber Command scheme.

Avro Lancaster EE139 ‘Phantom of the Ruhr’ represented the Squadron for the first 29 of its operational missions, before going on to amass an impressive tally of 121 total missions during WWII and was used as the inspiration for this Hawk scheme. Applied to the Commanding Officer’s aircraft, Hawk XX246 instantly became one of the most popular aircraft in the Royal Air Force and a fitting tribute to both the history of 100 Squadron and the men and women who have served over the years. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA36111 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Consolidated Catalina IVA JV928 ‘Y’ - Lt John Alexander Cruickshank VC, 210 Squadron, July 1944 - 100 Years of the RAF

As an Island nation, Britain would rely heavily on the contribution of long ranging maritime patrol aircraft during WWII, particularly the flying boats and brave crews of Coastal Command. Working alongside the mighty Short Sunderland, the American built Consolidated Catalina proved to be one of the most successful aircraft of its type, able to mount patrols which sometimes exceeded eighteen hours in duration and more than capable of destroying any enemy shipping they encountered along the way. During one such patrol on 17th July 1944, Catalina JV928, piloted by Scotsman John Cruickshank, was five hours into a mission west of the Lofoten Islands in the Norwegian Sea, when the crew obtained a radar signal from the sea below. Aware that the Royal Navy were reportedly in the area, the aircraft flew down for a closer look, only to be confronted by German U-boat U361 and its compliment of anti-aircraft guns. Immediately preparing to go on the offensive, Cruickshank executed a perfect attack run, only to see the depth charges to fail to release from the aircraft. Determined to press home their attack and with the weapon issue now resolved, the Catalina was brought in for a second run, this time into a hail of well aimed shells from the U-boat crew now fully aware of the aircrafts destructive intentions. Taking multiple hits to the front of the Catalina and inflicting significant injuries on crew members, the attack resulted in the depth charges deploying at [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA36211 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Gloster Sea Gladiator N5519: G6A, 802 Squadron, HMS Glorious June 1939 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA36408 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Eurofighter Typhoon, FGR.4, ZJ950/C, ‘Charity’ RAF No.29 Squadron, Falklands Defense [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA36409 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Eurofighter Typhoon T3 ZK380 - 100 Years of RAF [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA37005 - 1/144 Scale Click to Enlarge VC-10C 1K 101 Sqn RAF Brize Norton Oxfordshire 2007

In 1978, the RAF had five ex-BOAC VC10s and four ex-East African Airways Super VC10s converted as air-to-air refuelling tankers. These were known in service as the VC-10 K2 and VC-10 K3 respectively. Both variants had underwing refuelling pods, and a centreline refuelling point installed in the rear freight bay. An in-flight refuelling probe was fitted on to the nose, allowing fuel to be taken from other tankers.

In 1981, 14 ex-British Airways Super VC10s were purchased, and 5 were converted to VC-10 K4 tankers, reducing the others to spares in the 1990's. 13 surviving VC10 C1s were then equipped with wing refuelling pods and re-designated as VC-10 C1K dual-role tanker/transports – and still serve with No.101 Sqn at RAF Brize Norton, Oxon. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA37610 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Westland Wessex HC.2 XV721, 72 Squadron RAF

The Westland Wessex was a turbine-powered helicopter which was a development of the American Sikorsky S58. It was picked up by the RAF from the Royal Navy in the early sixties when they required a general-purpose helicopter capable of carrying troops, conducting ground attacks and acting as an air ambulance. In 1969, two Wessexes were ordered with specific modifications in mind, with the aim of VIP use, specifically with The Queen’s Flight. Prince Charles, Princess Anne and The Queen Mother were regular passengers, with Prince Philip even piloting the aircraft over the years. It wasn’t until August 1977 that Queen Elizabeth herself finally took her seat on board and took to the skies. Now housed in the RAF museum in Hendon, it continues to draw a crowd. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA37707 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Royal Aircraft Factory SE5a, C1149/W 'Schweinhund', Capt. Duncan Grinnell-Milne, No.56 Sqn RFC, 1918

Duncan Grinnell-Milne was seconded to the Royal Flying Corps in 1915 and following his flying training, he joined No.16 Squadron in France, scoring his first aerial victory flying a BE2. In late 1915, he was shot down and crash landed behind enemy lines. Captured by German forces, he was forced to spend more than two years in a German prisoner of war camp, before eventually escaping and making his way back to France. Returning to flying duty as the Commanding Officer of No.56 Squadron RFC, Grinnell-Milne managed to score five more victories in the last weeks of the war. His unique SE5a (C1149/W) had a non-standard fuselage colour and carried the name ‘Schweinhund’, which was a reference to how the German guards would address him and his fellow POWs.

At a time when the German Air Services were enjoying a period of air superiority over the Western front, the arrival of the British Royal Aircraft Factory SE5a fighter proved to be a significant development. At last, the RFC had an aircraft which was capable of taking on and beating the best German fighters and Allied airmen again began to claim a significant number of victories over their adversaries. In conjunction with the excellent Sopwith Camel, the SE5a was significant in regaining Allied air superiority over the trenches of the Western Front and crucially, ensured that they retained control for the rest of the war. The SE5a was undoubtedly one of the finest fighter aircraft of the Great Air War. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA37708 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge RAF SE5A 56 Squadron RFC 1917 - 100 Years of RAF [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA37808 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Albatros D.V a , D.7327/17, Lt. Lothar Weiland, Jasta 5 , Seefrontstaffel 1, July 1918 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA37907 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge SPAD XIII, S29005 Major Francesco Baracca, 91st Squadriglia, Italian Air Force, April 1918 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA38108 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Sopwith Camel F1, B6313, Major William George ‘Billy’ Barker C/O , No.139 Sqn, Italy 1918 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA38208 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Douglas Dakota C-47, 'Kwicherbichen', BBMF [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA38209 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Douglas C-47A Skytrain - Berlin Airlift [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA38306 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Fokker Dr.I Triplane, 213/17 ‘K’, Lt. Friederich Kempf, Jasta 2, Pronville Aerodrome, 1917

The pace of aviation development throughout the First World War was nothing short of astonishing and saw the aeroplane become a critical component of any future military planning. Initially required to allow accurate observation of enemy positions and troop movements, it quickly became apparent that denying the enemy the ability to obtain this type of reconnaissance information would be vital and the first aerial duels began to take place. Early exchanges were nothing more than pilots shooting at their adversaries using their service revolvers, but specially designed fighter aircraft soon began to appear, determined to gain superiority of the air. Perhaps the most famous German fighter of the First World War was the Fokker Dr.1 Triplane, or Dreidecker, which was produced to counter the British Sopwith Triplane introduced so successfully during the Battle of Arras in April 1917. Produced in relatively small numbers, the DR.1 was operated by elite units and in the hands of such ace pilots as Manfred von Richthofen, earned the aircraft a fearsome reputation. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA38307 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Fokker DR. 1 Dreidekker [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA38308 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Fokker DR. 1 Manfred Von Richofen - Red Baron [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA38808 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Dornier 17Z-10 Kauz R4+AK, I/NJG.2 - Erich Jung, Gilze-Rijen airfield, Holland, October 1940

As the most heavily produced version of the Luftwaffe’s distinctive ‘Flying Pencil’, the Dornier Do17Z would see plenty of action during WWII, including several roles for which the aircraft was not initially intended. Almost obsolete by the time of the Battle of Britain, this ungainly looking bomber was also rather surprisingly pressed into service as a heavy night fighter, as the Luftwaffe tried to establish an effective force to repel the growing number of RAF raids targeting German cities.

Contesting a deadly game of nocturnal cat and mouse, the aircraft of l/NJG.2 represented a specialist unit mounting long range night intruder missions over Britain, aiming to disrupt Bomber Command operations a little closer to their home bases, attacking bombers returning from their latest raid as they prepared to land.

This sinister looking Do17Z-10 Kauz (Screech Owl) had been modified specifically for the task and was equipped with a nose mounted infra-red searchlight and detection system, along with a devastating array of weaponry designed to make short work of any British bomber it detected. Operating from the captured Dutch airfield at Gilze-Rijen, R4+AK was the mount of future night fighter ace Erich Jung, who ended the war with 28 nocturnal victories. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA38906 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Fokker D.VII (OAW) 4649/18 "Seven Swabians" Wilhelm Scheutzel, Jasta 65, September 1918

Although the air war had turned inexorably in favour of the Allies by the late summer of 1918, the Luftstreitkrafte were still able to introduce an aircraft which is generally considered to be the finest fighter of the Great War, the Fokker D.VII. German pilots had a saying that this new fighter could make a mediocre pilot good and a good pilot into an ace, but unfortunately this was to prove a case of too little, too late.

Fokker D.VII 4649/18 has to be considered one of the most flamboyantly decorated fighters of the Great War – adorning both sides of the aircraft’s fuselage, an elaborate scene featuring the ‘Seven Swabians’ from a famous Brothers Grimm German Fairy Tale must have made for an unusual sight. Brandishing an oversized spear which required all seven of the Swabians to carry, the story tells the farcical tale of this hapless group and their futile attempts to achieve greatness through performing great deeds.

Showing an incredible level of artistic talent, the artwork was slightly different on both sides of the aircraft, however, despite all this decorative effort, this particular fighter was to achieve no more than two aerial victories during its short service career. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA39213 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Supermarine Spitfire MK. IIa P7823 - 100 Years of RAF [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA39807 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Panavia Tornado F.3 ZG797/D ‘Desperation’ RAF No.29 Squadron, Falklands Defense [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC03502 - 1/45 Scale Click to Enlarge Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Flying Car

2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the wonderful musical adventure that is “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.” The movie is loosely based on the 1964 novel by Ian Fleming with the screen adaptation written by iconic children’s author Roald Dahl and directed by Ken Hughes.

To mark this anniversary, we’re proud to re-introduce the iconic 1:45 scale car back into the Corgi range. The wings are moveable and the car will contain all four characters from the original November 1968 release, Dick Van Dyke’s character Caractacus Potts, Adrian Hall’s Jeremy Potts, Heather Ripley’s Jemima Potts and Sally Ann Howes’ Truly Scrumptious! [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC04311 - 1/36 Scale Click to Enlarge James Bond - Aston Martin DB5 - GoldenEye 1995 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC04804 - 1/36 Scale Click to Enlarge James Bond - Aston Martin Vantage - The Living Daylights (1987) [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC05401 Click to Enlarge Beatles Yellow Submarine

To mark the 50th anniversary of the release of The Beatles’ iconic film, Yellow Submarine (1968), we are re-releasing our fun-filled Corgi Yellow Submarine model.

Originally released in 1969 the model will include moveable hatches to reveal four original Beatles figures as well as a rotating periscope which moves as the model is pushed along. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC07103 - 1/36 Scale Click to Enlarge James Bond - AMC Hornet - The Man With The Golden Gun (1974) [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC08001 - 1/36 Scale Click to Enlarge James Bond - Aston Martin DB10 - Spectre (2015) [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC12941 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Scania Topline Moving Floor, S.Walker Transport, Beoley, near Redditch - Hauliers of Renown - NEW TOOLING - Limited Edition

This model features:
- Low light bar
- Front bumper bar
- Scania visor plug in lights
- Aerials
- High light bar
- Skirt light bar
- Chequer plating
- Mud flaps
- Visor mirror

Founded 1st May 1990 by Steve Walker and his partner Rosie, S. Walker Transport started with Steve buying his first truck, a 6x2 Scania 112-330.

Based in Beoley, near Redditch, Steve has operated an all Scania fleet from the beginning. With a current fleet consisting of over forty-one Moving Floor vehicles, S. Walker Transport has become one of the UK’s leading Moving Floor Trailer specialists also providing recovery services as well as Unit and Trailer repairs.

Many of the company's specialised moving floor trailers feature side opening doors and some are equipped with Moffet Mounty forklift trucks that piggy back on the back of trailers meaning that forklifts are not needed on site. All of the S. Walker Transport vehicles are fitted with satellite navigation devices that provide the exact location of their vehicles at any time. The transport office has a unique feature with its all-female workforce led by Steve’s partner Rosie. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC14029 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Volvo FH Fridge Trailer Iggy Madden, Galway - Hauliers of Renown

This family run business began in 1978 and has since become one of the leading transport and distribution companies in the West of Ireland. Based at Galway docks, the company is ideally located to serve the entire western seaboard and has recently expanded to include facilities on the east coast to provide an efficient and cost effective service throughout the country.

The distinctive yellow and black livery of Iggy Madden is recognised across Europe. Their fleet comprises a variety of trailers including straight and split refrigerated trailers, flats, euroliners, skeletal trailers, boxvans, bulk tippers, tankers and low loaders. The company's live temperature tracked refrigerated trailers operate daily throughout the UK and Europe and all of their vehicles are fully equipped with DriveCam Technology and satellite tracking. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC15206 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge DJB Haulage Ltd., MAN TG-X Vinyl Curtainside, Radstock, NR Bath [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC15305 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge British Road Services - Scania 110 with Tandem Axle Tilt Trailer, Limited Edition of 1000
This Scania LB110 tandem axle tilt was brand new to the BRS Depot Swindon in 1971. This unit was originally ordered to allow the group to compare it against a Scammell Crusader using identical continental routes. It fared well in comparison in terms of driver comfort and servicing capability.
[Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC42418 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge The Beatles - Magical Mystery Tour Bus

The Beatles released the “Magical Mystery Tour” album in 1967 to accompany the film of the same name which was first shown in the UK on Boxing Day.

The record proved a huge success, it had multiple weeks at number one in the charts in multiple countries and was nominated for “Album of the Year” at the 1968 Grammy Awards.

The re-release of this replica of the Bedford VAL used in the film is meticulously detailed and will appeal to both die-cast and Beatles collectors alike. [Age: 14 and up ]

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