49 Matches Found, 1 thru 49 on this page.
Maker - Item# - Scale Description
CORGI - AA27005 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Westland Puma HC.1 Helicopter 72 Squadron, Aldergrove 1997

This model features:
- Rotorspan approximately 8" - Rotating propellers
- Optional undercarriage down
- Detailed crew figure
- Sliding door
[Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27203 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Avro Vulcan B.2, XM607, RAF No.44 Sqn, ‘Operation Black Buck’, Falklands, 1982

As the final RAF Avro Vulcan squadrons were contemplating their impending withdrawal from service in early 1982, developments in the South Atlantic would see this mighty bomber go to war for the first time in its 26-year service history. Operation ‘Black Buck’ would require a Vulcan to drop 21 conventional 1,000lb bombs on the runway at Port Stanley, in the Falkland Islands, preventing Argentine forces from using their most capable strike and support aircraft. It would also send a strong message to Argentina’s political leaders that Britain would stop at nothing in re-taking the Islands.

The raid would be launched from RAF Ascension Island, which was some 6,300km from the Falklands and presented something of a logistical nightmare for military planners. Flown almost entirely over the sea, the Black Buck raids would require the support of twelve Victor tankers on the outbound leg, with a further two for the return flight and all the associated contingency plans.

Taking off from Ascension Island at midnight on 30th April 1982, Avro Vulcan B.2 XM607 piloted by Flight Lieutenant Martin Withers was to fly as reserve aircraft to the primary bomber XM598 on this highly complex raid, but was quickly promoted to lead aircraft on ‘Black Buck 1’ following technical difficulties encountered by XM598. Embarking on what was the longest bombing raid attempt in history, XM607 was refuelled seven times on its way to the Falkland Islands, before successfully releasing its payload of bombs acr [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27503 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Short Sunderland Mk.III, W39999 RB-Y 10 Squadron RAAF, Mount Batten Early 1942

The Short Sunderland Mk.III proved to be the definitive version of what was the RAF’s largest aircraft of the War. As the electronic detection of enemy U-boats became essential in disrupting their operations, the earlier stickleback radar antennas on the spine of the aircraft were replaced with the later and more capable ASV. MK.III units, which were housed in streamlined blisters underneath each wing, outboard of the floats as modelled here. As U-boats could now detect approaching RAF aircraft with their own radar sets, these new radar blisters operated outside the frequencies used by the previous units and ensured that Coastal Command Sunderlands continued to keep marauding U-boats fearful of attack from the air.

The sight of large numbers of these impressive flying boats operating from RAF Pembroke Dock must have been awe inspiring for anyone lucky enough to witness it. At one time, this was the largest seaplane base in the world, this Welsh coastal town was to become crucially important in the Battle of the Atlantic. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27604 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Hawker Hurricane MKI, V7795, Plt Off William 'Cherry' Vale, RAF 80 Sqn, Maleme, Crete, 1941

As strong German forces moved to secure their southern flank and rectify a failed Italian attempt to invade Greece, Allied forces found themselves in a steady retreat towards Crete. Extensive air operations saw large numbers of RAF aircraft engaged in fighting with both German and Italian air force units and despite initial successes, the came under increasing pressure.

Perhaps the most successful Hawker Hurricane Mk.I fighter of this difficult period was V7795, usually flown by Pilot Officer William Vale, of No.80 Squadron, Royal Air Force. Still displaying its standard RAF day fighter camouflage scheme, this unusual aircraft also included some additional field applied camouflage modifications to the leading edge and engine cowling, which were applied to just a small number of Hurricanes. Vale claimed eight enemy aircraft destroyed whilst flying this aircraft, during April and May 1941.

Following the success of the Hawker Hurricane during the Battle of Britain, it soon became clear that the Spitfire had the greatest potential for future development, which released the Hurricane for other duties. The rugged design of the Hurricane and numbers available to the RAF saw many machines sent overseas and as the war began to spread across the globe, so did the influence of the dependable Hurricane. From North Africa to Russia, the Hurricane continued to provide sterling service and continued to destroy Axis aircraft and military vehicles. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27605 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Hawker Hurricane MKI, P3576 J. B. Nicholson VC, 249 Squadron, August 1940

Following the success of the Hawker Hurricane during the Battle of Britain, it soon became clear that the Spitfire had the greatest potential for future development, which released the Hurricane for other duties. The rugged design of the Hurricane and numbers available to the RAF saw many machines sent overseas and as the war began to spread across the globe, so did the influence of the dependable Hurricane. From North Africa to Russia, the Hurricane continued to provide sterling service and continued to destroy Axis aircraft and military vehicles. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27606 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Hawker Hurricane MKI, YB-J, ‘Winged Popeye’ P.O. Leonard Walter Stevens No.17 Sqn, Debden, 1940

Following the success of the Hawker Hurricane during the Battle of Britain, it soon became clear that the Spitfire had the greatest potential for future development, which released the Hurricane for other duties. The rugged design of the Hurricane and numbers available to the RAF saw many machines sent overseas and as the war began to spread across the globe, so did the influence of the dependable Hurricane. From North Africa to Russia, the Hurricane continued to provide sterling service and continued to destroy Axis aircraft and military vehicles. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27702 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge North American Mustang F51-D, 'Was that too fast?', 18th Fighter Bomber Group USAF, South Korea 1951

At the start of the Korean War, significant numbers of Mustang fighters were available to the USAF, although most were now serving with Air National Guard units. Now designated F-51D, the Mustang was no longer the premier fighter aircraft it was in WWII, due to the advent of jet technology, but it was still a highly capable long-range strike aircraft. As a close air support aircraft, the Korean War Mustang dropped more napalm and fired more rockets than any other aircraft involved in the conflict, as it served with four air forces in support of United Nations. It was also involved in some of the first spiralling dogfights with the new Soviet MiG-15 jet fighter. Highly susceptible to the latest anti-aircraft defences, many close air support Mustangs were lost during the Korean conflict.

The North American P-51 Mustang was arguably the finest fighter aircraft of WWII and was significant in finally subduing any hope the Luftwaffe had of offering resistance to Allied air incursions. Only seeing service in the final months of the war, the impressive Mustang possessed range, speed, firepower and manoeuvrability, which were attributes used to the maximum by USAAF and RAF fighter pilots, in their efforts to secure air superiority. The Mustang saw extensive service in the European Theatre and towards the end of the Pacific War, where it was to prove decisive in combat. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27703 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge North American Mustang Mk.IV, Werner Christie, No.150 Wing, RAF Hunsdon, 1945

As its history was very much connected to British requirements, it is no surprise that the Mustang was used extensively by the Royal Air Force during WWII, from the early Allison powered Mustang I, to the Dallas produced, Packard Merlin powered IVa. The final victory for a WWII RAF Mustang belonged to Norwegian ace Werner Christie, who was flying his personal machine KH790. Following the conclusion of a successful bomber escort mission over Germany, Christie led his Mustangs in search of Luftwaffe fighters. Flying above Finow airfield, he noticed a flight of Fw 190s and immediately dived to attack. His first burst of fire caught the wing of an unsuspecting Focke Wulf, blowing half of the wing off and sending the fighter spiralling into the ground. This would be Christie’s eleventh and final victory of the war.

Regarded as one of the most successful aircraft of all time and something of an American classic, the Mustang actually came into production following a British requirement for additional fighters. Rather than licence build the Curtiss P-40 fighters the British were looking for, North American Aviation promised a totally new aircraft, which would be superior to the P-40. A proud boast from this relatively new manufacturer, but could they pull it off? In record time, they built a prototype aircraft which showed great promise and the British immediately placed a large order. Originally powered by the American Allison V-1710 engine, the Mustang I was faster than the Spitfire and possessed greater range, but at higher altitudes, the performance significantly dropped off. In an attempt to rectify this deficiency, the Mustang was married with the successful and combat proven Rolls-Royce Merlin engine and the rest is history – the Merlin powered Mustang was a superb fighting aeroplane. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27704 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge North American Mustang P-51D, Captain Ray Wetmore 'Daddy's Girl', 370 FS, March 1945

As its history was very much connected to British requirements, it is no surprise that the Mustang was used extensively by the Royal Air Force during WWII, from the early Allison powered Mustang I, to the Dallas produced, Packard Merlin powered IVa. The final victory for a WWII RAF Mustang belonged to Norwegian ace Werner Christie, who was flying his personal machine KH790. Following the conclusion of a successful bomber escort mission over Germany, Christie led his Mustangs in search of Luftwaffe fighters. Flying above Finow airfield, he noticed a flight of Fw 190s and immediately dived to attack. His first burst of fire caught the wing of an unsuspecting Focke Wulf, blowing half of the wing off and sending the fighter spiralling into the ground. This would be Christie’s eleventh and final victory of the war.

Regarded as one of the most successful aircraft of all time and something of an American classic, the Mustang actually came into production following a British requirement for additional fighters. Rather than licence build the Curtiss P-40 fighters the British were looking for, North American Aviation promised a totally new aircraft, which would be superior to the P-40. A proud boast from this relatively new manufacturer, but could they pull it off? In record time, they built a prototype aircraft which showed great promise and the British immediately placed a large order. Originally powered by the American Allison V-1710 engine, the Mustang I was faster than the S [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA27705 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge North American Mustang P51-D "Hurry Home Honey", 44-1473 364th F/Squadron 357th Fighter Group

As its history was very much connected to British requirements, it is no surprise that the Mustang was used extensively by the Royal Air Force during WWII, from the early Allison powered Mustang I, to the Dallas produced, Packard Merlin powered IVa. The final victory for a WWII RAF Mustang belonged to Norwegian ace Werner Christie, who was flying his personal machine KH790. Following the conclusion of a successful bomber escort mission over Germany, Christie led his Mustangs in search of Luftwaffe fighters. Flying above Finow airfield, he noticed a flight of Fw 190s and immediately dived to attack. His first burst of fire caught the wing of an unsuspecting Focke Wulf, blowing half of the wing off and sending the fighter spiralling into the ground. This would be Christie’s eleventh and final victory of the war.

Regarded as one of the most successful aircraft of all time and something of an American classic, the Mustang actually came into production following a British requirement for additional fighters. Rather than licence build the Curtiss P-40 fighters the British were looking for, North American Aviation promised a totally new aircraft, which would be superior to the P-40. A proud boast from this relatively new manufacturer, but could they pull it off? In record time, they built a prototype aircraft which showed great promise and the British immediately placed a large order. Originally powered by the American Allison V-1710 engine, the Mustang I was faster than [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA28001 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4, W.Nr.5057, Oberleutnant Josef ‘Pips’ Priller, 6./JG51

The Messerschmitt Bf 109 series of fighter aircraft have to be regarded as some of the most famous aircraft ever to take to the skies. This diminutive and highly capable fighter was in constant production throughout the Second World War, as the basic Messerschmitt airframe proved to be highly adaptable and capable of significant modification. Making its combat debut during the Spanish Civil War, the Bf 109 was one of the first truly modern fighter aircraft, making its first flight before either the Supermarine Spitfire or the Hawker Hurricane - it could be argued that modern monoplane fighter design began with the Messerschmitt Bf 109.

During the Second World War, the Bf 109 earned a fearsome reputation with its adversaries and was synonymous with the ruthless effectiveness of the Wehrmacht, particularly during the early years of the conflict. It was also the mount of many of the worlds most accomplished air ‘aces’ and proved to be one of the most reliable and hard-hitting fighter aircraft ever produced. Significantly, the Messerschmitt Bf 109 was the most heavily produced fighter aircraft in history, with no fewer than 33,984 machines being built – undoubtedly one of the most important aircraft in the history of powered flight.

Already a Luftwaffe fighter ace by the start of the Battle of Britain, Josef ‘Pips’ Priller and the pilots of JG51 would be heavily involved in the fighting against the RAF over the summer of 1940, with many of his comrades falling to the guns of the British airmen. Priller and his Bf 109 were to score at least 14 victories during the Battle of Britain and was to eventually end the war with an astonishing 101 victories from 307 combat missions flown. Within this number, Priller claimed at least 68 Spitfires destroyed, which was the highest Luftwaffe ace tally against Britain’s most famous fighter. He was also one of only a small number of Luftwaffe aces to fight solely in the skies above Western Europe, against the best aircraft available to the Allies. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA28003 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4, Fähnrich Hans-Joachim Marseille, ‘White 14’ 1940

The Messerschmitt Bf 109 series of fighter aircraft have to be regarded as some of the most famous aircraft ever to take to the skies. This diminutive and highly capable fighter was in constant production throughout the Second World War, as the basic Messerschmitt airframe proved to be highly adaptable and capable of significant modification. Making its combat debut during the Spanish Civil War, the Bf 109 was one of the first truly modern fighter aircraft, making its first flight before either the Supermarine Spitfire or the Hawker Hurricane - it could be argued that modern monoplane fighter design began with the Messerschmitt Bf 109.

During the Second World War, the Bf 109 earned a fearsome reputation with its adversaries and was synonymous with the ruthless effectiveness of the Wehrmacht, particularly during the early years of the conflict. It was also the mount of many of the worlds most accomplished air ‘aces’ and proved to be one of the most reliable and hard-hitting fighter aircraft ever produced. Significantly, the Messerschmitt Bf 109 was the most heavily produced fighter aircraft in history, with no fewer than 33,984 machines being built – undoubtedly one of the most important aircraft in the history of powered flight.

Already a Luftwaffe fighter ace by the start of the Battle of Britain, Josef ‘Pips’ Priller and the pilots of JG51 would be heavily involved in the fighting against the RAF over the summer of 1940, with many of his comrades falling to the guns of the Brit [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA28004 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Messerschmitt Bf 109E-4, 'Yellow 1' 9./JG 26, Caffiers, France, August 1940

The Messerschmitt Bf 109 series of fighter aircraft have to be regarded as some of the most famous aircraft ever to take to the skies. This diminutive and highly capable fighter was in constant production throughout the Second World War, as the basic Messerschmitt airframe proved to be highly adaptable and capable of significant modification. Making its combat debut during the Spanish Civil War, the Bf 109 was one of the first truly modern fighter aircraft, making its first flight before either the Supermarine Spitfire or the Hawker Hurricane - it could be argued that modern monoplane fighter design began with the Messerschmitt Bf 109.

During the Second World War, the Bf 109 earned a fearsome reputation with its adversaries and was synonymous with the ruthless effectiveness of the Wehrmacht, particularly during the early years of the conflict. It was also the mount of many of the worlds most accomplished air ‘aces’ and proved to be one of the most reliable and hard-hitting fighter aircraft ever produced. Significantly, the Messerschmitt Bf 109 was the most heavily produced fighter aircraft in history, with no fewer than 33,984 machines being built – undoubtedly one of the most important aircraft in the history of powered flight.

Already a Luftwaffe fighter ace by the start of the Battle of Britain, Josef ‘Pips’ Priller and the pilots of JG51 would be heavily involved in the fighting against the RAF over the summer of 1940, with many of his comrades falling to the guns of the [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA28103 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Curtiss Tomahawk IIA AK402 P/O Neville Duke, 122 Squadron [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA33421 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Westland Sea King, HC.4 ZA290, 846 Naval Air Squadron, Falklands, 1982 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA33617 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Panavia Tornado GR4 ZA461 15XV R Squadron Centenary Scheme 2015 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA34113 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Blackburn Buccaneer S2, XW538, 16 Squadron RAF Gutersloh November 1977 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA34316 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Focke-Wulf FW190 F-8, 'Black 3', Feldwebel Eugen Lorcher, II./SG2, 5 Staffel, Aufthausen, May 1945

As RAF pilots began to report the appearance of a new German fighter in the skies above Europe in the summer of 1941, they could not have known how significant this would become. For the next year, the Focke-Wulf Fw 190 would rule the skies and claim a heavy toll of RAF aircraft in the process. The increased loss rates were causing huge concern, when a Focke-Wulf pilot became disorientated, following combat with Spitfires over southern England and inadvertently landed his pristine machine at RAF Pembrey – The RAF had their Focke-Wulf! Following exhaustive testing of the captured aircraft, a new Spitfire was developed, which was capable of taking on and beating the new Luftwaffe fighter. The Spitfire IX proved to be more than a match for the Focke-Wulf and for a short time, the balance of power shifted again. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA34811 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Vickers Wellington R1162 / AA-Y, ‘Y for Yorker’, RAF Feltwell, Norfolk, 1941 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA35313 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge North American B-25B Mitchell, 40-2249, "Hari Kari-er", Doolittle Raid, 1942 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA35709 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Messerschmitt Me262B-1A ‘Mosquito Hunter’, Red 10, Kurt Welter 10./ NJG 11 1945 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA36211 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Gloster Sea Gladiator N5519: G6A, 802 Squadron, HMS Glorious June 1939 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA36408 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Eurofighter Typhoon, FGR.4, ZJ950/C, ‘Charity’ RAF No.29 Squadron, Falklands Defense [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA36510 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Hawker Typhoon IV 'Pulverizer', 440 Sqn, RCAF "City of Ottawa" [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA37005 - 1/144 Scale Click to Enlarge VC-10C 1K 101 Sqn RAF Brize Norton Oxfordshire 2007

In 1978, the RAF had five ex-BOAC VC10s and four ex-East African Airways Super VC10s converted as air-to-air refuelling tankers. These were known in service as the VC-10 K2 and VC-10 K3 respectively. Both variants had underwing refuelling pods, and a centreline refuelling point installed in the rear freight bay. An in-flight refuelling probe was fitted on to the nose, allowing fuel to be taken from other tankers.

In 1981, 14 ex-British Airways Super VC10s were purchased, and 5 were converted to VC-10 K4 tankers, reducing the others to spares in the 1990's. 13 surviving VC10 C1s were then equipped with wing refuelling pods and re-designated as VC-10 C1K dual-role tanker/transports – and still serve with No.101 Sqn at RAF Brize Norton, Oxon. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA37610 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Westland Wessex HC.2 XV721, 72 Squadron RAF

The Westland Wessex was a turbine-powered helicopter which was a development of the American Sikorsky S58. It was picked up by the RAF from the Royal Navy in the early sixties when they required a general-purpose helicopter capable of carrying troops, conducting ground attacks and acting as an air ambulance. In 1969, two Wessexes were ordered with specific modifications in mind, with the aim of VIP use, specifically with The Queen’s Flight. Prince Charles, Princess Anne and The Queen Mother were regular passengers, with Prince Philip even piloting the aircraft over the years. It wasn’t until August 1977 that Queen Elizabeth herself finally took her seat on board and took to the skies. Now housed in the RAF museum in Hendon, it continues to draw a crowd. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA37707 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Royal Aircraft Factory SE5a, C1149/W 'Schweinhund', Capt. Duncan Grinnell-Milne, No.56 Sqn RFC, 1918

Duncan Grinnell-Milne was seconded to the Royal Flying Corps in 1915 and following his flying training, he joined No.16 Squadron in France, scoring his first aerial victory flying a BE2. In late 1915, he was shot down and crash landed behind enemy lines. Captured by German forces, he was forced to spend more than two years in a German prisoner of war camp, before eventually escaping and making his way back to France. Returning to flying duty as the Commanding Officer of No.56 Squadron RFC, Grinnell-Milne managed to score five more victories in the last weeks of the war. His unique SE5a (C1149/W) had a non-standard fuselage colour and carried the name ‘Schweinhund’, which was a reference to how the German guards would address him and his fellow POWs.

At a time when the German Air Services were enjoying a period of air superiority over the Western front, the arrival of the British Royal Aircraft Factory SE5a fighter proved to be a significant development. At last, the RFC had an aircraft which was capable of taking on and beating the best German fighters and Allied airmen again began to claim a significant number of victories over their adversaries. In conjunction with the excellent Sopwith Camel, the SE5a was significant in regaining Allied air superiority over the trenches of the Western Front and crucially, ensured that they retained control for the rest of the war. The SE5a was undoubtedly one of the finest fighter aircraft of the Great Air War. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA37808 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Albatros D.V a , D.7327/17, Lt. Lothar Weiland, Jasta 5 , Seefrontstaffel 1, July 1918 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA37907 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge SPAD XIII, S29005 Major Francesco Baracca, 91st Squadriglia, Italian Air Force, April 1918 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA38108 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Sopwith Camel F1, B6313, Major William George ‘Billy’ Barker C/O , No.139 Sqn, Italy 1918 [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA38208 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Douglas Dakota C-47, 'Kwicherbichen', BBMF [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA38306 - 1/48 Scale Click to Enlarge Fokker Dr.I Triplane, 213/17 ‘K’, Lt. Friederich Kempf, Jasta 2, Pronville Aerodrome, 1917

The pace of aviation development throughout the First World War was nothing short of astonishing and saw the aeroplane become a critical component of any future military planning. Initially required to allow accurate observation of enemy positions and troop movements, it quickly became apparent that denying the enemy the ability to obtain this type of reconnaissance information would be vital and the first aerial duels began to take place. Early exchanges were nothing more than pilots shooting at their adversaries using their service revolvers, but specially designed fighter aircraft soon began to appear, determined to gain superiority of the air. Perhaps the most famous German fighter of the First World War was the Fokker Dr.1 Triplane, or Dreidecker, which was produced to counter the British Sopwith Triplane introduced so successfully during the Battle of Arras in April 1917. Produced in relatively small numbers, the DR.1 was operated by elite units and in the hands of such ace pilots as Manfred von Richthofen, earned the aircraft a fearsome reputation. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA38408 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Bristol Blenheim Mk.I, L6739 (G-BPIV), The IWM Duxford 2015

At the time the new Bristol Blenheim made its first flight at Filton aerodrome on 12th April 1935, it was faster than any fighter aircraft currently in service with the Royal Air Force. Initially developed as a private venture funded by Lord Rothermere, the owner of the Daily Mail Newspaper, the new aircraft set a new speed record for civilian aircraft and was donated to the Air Ministry for trials and evaluation.

Clearly impressed with the capability of this advanced new design, the RAF immediately ordered a bomber version of the aircraft straight off the drawing board. Although the Blenheim would prove to be a significant step forward in aviation technology, it would also be used as a yardstick against which all other new designs would be judged - a new breed of fighter must outclass the Blenheim. Significantly, at the outbreak of the Second World War, the RAF had more Bristol Blenheims in service than any other aircraft and it was to see extensive service in the air battles to come. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA38507 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Messerschmitt Bf110E 5./Nachtjagdgeschwader 1, June 1942 - Heinz -Wolfgang Schnaufer [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - AA39007 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Westland Lynx HAS 3 (ICE), assigned to HMS Endurance, 2002

Westland Lynx HAS 3 ICE XZ246 (434/EE) is one of a number of helicopters, which have served on board Antarctic survey and ice patrol vessel HMS Endurance, in particularly challenging conditions. For this specific role, some of the equipment usually found on Royal Navy Lynx aircraft was removed, but the reliable Lynx proved to be essential in the effective polar operations of Endurance. Two ice modified Lynx aircraft were usually carried on board HMS Endurance, at any one time.

When considering military aviation currently in service with the world’s air forces, the helicopter is arguably the most flexible and operationally capable aircraft available to commanders. As international commitments and military requirements continue to evolve, the helicopter is becoming increasingly important to operations at home and abroad. Since the Westland Lynx was introduced in 1978, it has proved itself as one of the most advanced and capable helicopters in the world. Fast and highly adaptable, the Lynx has the distinction of being the world’s first fully aerobatic helicopter, capable of performing some quite astonishing manoeuvres. A true multirole combat aircraft, the Lynx is also a deadly tank destroyer and submarine hunter, due to remain in British service for many years to come. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - AA39603 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge HAWKER AUDAX - K4853, n.28 Sqn, Kohal, India 1941 - Limited Edition
- Wingspan over 6" - Rotating propeller
- Detailed crew figures
- Fixed undercarriage
- Armaments and weapons
- Fine rigging detail

Developed in the early 1930s from the already proven Hawker Hart light day bomber, the Audax was a dedicated army co-operation version. With this new role in mind it incorporated a message hook under the fuselage and lengthened exhaust pipes to reduce glare for the crew as they flew close to the ground. Although the aircraft entered service with the RAF in January 1932, the Audax was still to be found flying with the RAF during the early years of the Second World War, mostly in the Middle East. 28 Squadron, based in India, was one such Audax unit. Flying from Kohal, the squadron used the Audax for reconnaissance work and general army co-operation duties before replacing them with Westland Lysanders in 1942. [Age: 14 and up ] [Inches: 6" wingspan ]

CORGI - AA39807 - 1/72 Scale Click to Enlarge Panavia Tornado F.3 ZG797/D ‘Desperation’ RAF No.29 Squadron, Falklands Defense [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC12941 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Scania Topline Moving Floor, S.Walker Transport, Beoley, near Redditch - Hauliers of Renown - NEW TOOLING - Limited Edition

This model features:
- Low light bar
- Front bumper bar
- Scania visor plug in lights
- Aerials
- High light bar
- Skirt light bar
- Chequer plating
- Mud flaps
- Visor mirror

Founded 1st May 1990 by Steve Walker and his partner Rosie, S. Walker Transport started with Steve buying his first truck, a 6x2 Scania 112-330.

Based in Beoley, near Redditch, Steve has operated an all Scania fleet from the beginning. With a current fleet consisting of over forty-one Moving Floor vehicles, S. Walker Transport has become one of the UK’s leading Moving Floor Trailer specialists also providing recovery services as well as Unit and Trailer repairs.

Many of the company's specialised moving floor trailers feature side opening doors and some are equipped with Moffet Mounty forklift trucks that piggy back on the back of trailers meaning that forklifts are not needed on site. All of the S. Walker Transport vehicles are fitted with satellite navigation devices that provide the exact location of their vehicles at any time. The transport office has a unique feature with its all-female workforce led by Steve’s partner Rosie. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC13752 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Scania R Moving Floor Trailer Motward Timber Recycling Ltd, Huntingdon - Haulers of Renown

Since its beginnings in 1977, Motward Limited has developed a fleet of vehicles that covers the whole of the UK. The core of its business is with wooden pallets but they also undertake general haulage up to 44 tonnes nationwide. Its trailer fleet consists of curtain-siders, bulk tippers and moving floor trailers, as modelled here.

In 1999 Motward Timber Recycling (MTR) was formed due to the increasing quantity of timber waste generated by the pallet company. MTR delivers its high grade wood chip and bark supplies via their Moving Floor trailers. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC13826 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Mercedes Actros (Face lift) Fridge Trailer, Montgomery Transport - Hauliers of Renown - Limited Edition

Established in 1970 with just one tractor unit, the privately owned Montgomery Transport Group is part of the Ballyvesey Holdings Group. Having grown significantly in recent years, the company now provides a diverse range of logistic services through the UK, Ireland and Europe. The group’s success has secured them many major contracts with well-known brands such as Nestle, Walkers, Ikea and P&G to name but a few.

Montgomery Refrigerated Limited formed in 2003 and has become Ireland’s fastest growing Refrigerated Distribution Company. With operating locations in Portadown, Dublin and Preston, they provide chilled and frozen transportation across the UK and Ireland for some of their biggest customers including Tesco, Asda and Cadbury Trebor Bassett. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC14029 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Volvo FH Fridge Trailer Iggy Madden, Galway - Hauliers of Renown

This family run business began in 1978 and has since become one of the leading transport and distribution companies in the West of Ireland. Based at Galway docks, the company is ideally located to serve the entire western seaboard and has recently expanded to include facilities on the east coast to provide an efficient and cost effective service throughout the country.

The distinctive yellow and black livery of Iggy Madden is recognised across Europe. Their fleet comprises a variety of trailers including straight and split refrigerated trailers, flats, euroliners, skeletal trailers, boxvans, bulk tippers, tankers and low loaders. The company's live temperature tracked refrigerated trailers operate daily throughout the UK and Europe and all of their vehicles are fully equipped with DriveCam Technology and satellite tracking. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC14116 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Downton Delivers - DAF XF Moving Floor Trailer Downton, England - Haulers of Renown

One of the UK's leading independent logistics firms servicing some of the biggest blue chip companies in the world, including Dyson and Magners Cider, Downton began life in 1955 when Conrad Downton invested £16 in a gravel-carrying tipper lorry. The owner of a small Gloucestershire farm, Conrad started delivering small loads around the county in an attempt to supplement his family's modest living. Starting with hay and straw he soon moved onto gravel and construction materials. Before long Downton was involved in major projects such as the construction of the M5.

By the end of the 1960s the company had built up a fleet of tipper vehicles and become well established in the construction industry. By 1975 Downton had purchased its first articulated lorry and with some major brewer contracts under their wing they soon acquired a fleet of 16 articulated vehicles.

Sadly, in 1985 at the age of just 52, Conrad died suddenly leaving his three sons – Andrew, Richard and John to continue their father's vision of turning a flourishing but small haulage company into a major logistics firm. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC15206 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge DJB Haulage Ltd., MAN TG-X Vinyl Curtainside, Radstock, NR Bath [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC15305 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge British Road Services - Scania 110 with Tandem Axle Tilt Trailer, Limited Edition of 1000
This Scania LB110 tandem axle tilt was brand new to the BRS Depot Swindon in 1971. This unit was originally ordered to allow the group to compare it against a Scammell Crusader using identical continental routes. It fared well in comparison in terms of driver comfort and servicing capability.
[Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - CC15308 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Scania 141 Tilt Trailer David W. Haig International Transport, Scotland - Hauliers of Renown

In 1946, David Wilkie Haig acquired an ex-war department Thornycroft lorry after returning to his home town of Bellshill and decided to set up a transport business. With the British economy struggling to recover from six years of war David was swamped with an increasing amount of customers and workload which would soon lead to the expansion of his one waggon fleet. By the 1960s he had acquired a fleet of over 40 trucks.

The opening of Coatbridge's Freightliner terminal proved a valuable source of work for the lorries and remains so today. The green, red and cream Haig vehicles are a familiar site as they travel across Scotland and the North of England. By 1969 the firm started its weekly Italian service which continues to this day.

Trips to Europe in the late 60s were often quite challenging for the drivers, with a lack of motorways and bypasses and inevitable customs delays, though nowadays the Italian runs can be done slightly quicker. The company's reputable and longstanding international services earned them 'Scottish European Haulier of the Year' at the 2002 Transport news Scottish Rewards.

In 1985 David Haig retired after 39 years in the industry which included being a founding member of The Road Haulage Association. Now in its third generation the Haig family fleet operates from a purpose built depot at Reema Road in Bellshill. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - CC15504 - 1/50 Scale Click to Enlarge Volvo F10 Tilt Trailer E.M. Rogers Ltd European Transport, England - Hauliers of Renown

Established in 1945, E.M. Rogers Limited remains a family owned international transport business. Based in Northampton and with supporting offices in Italy, Holland and Spain the company operates from a purpose built 7 acre site.

The company boasts a fleet of over 65 units, 80% of which are under 3 years old. The majority of the 140+ trailers comprise of tilt trailers, as modelled here, and curtainsides, as well as a number of mega trailers for high volume cargo, machinery trailers for the transportation of wheeled and tracked construction equipment and specialist hard-bodied and curtain-sided multi-deck car transported trailers. [Age: 14 and up ]

CORGI - GS62206 Click to Enlarge London 2012 Olympics - Wenlock Guard Key ring [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - USA2010 Click to Enlarge Corgi 2010 First Half Catalog [Age: 14 and up ]
CORGI - VA10011 - 1/43 Scale Click to Enlarge 1991 Bertie Fisher - Ford Sierra Sapphire Cosworth [Age: 14 and up ]
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